Event Date and Time
-
Location
1101 Morrill Hall, UMD College Park

About the Presentation

Internships are ubiquitous but empirically underresearched.  This study utilizes student surveys, online job advertisements, college course catalogs, and semi-structured interviews with internship recruiters and college career counselors to evaluate: 1) Empirical trends in student participation and employer demand in internships; 2) Organizational pressures and constraints of internships within colleges and worksites; and 3) Implications for student learning and equity in the college to career transition.  Results provide evidence that more (versus less) privileged students are more likely to participate in internships, employers have significantly increased internship hiring requirements since the recession, and that many colleges are constrained in their capacity to facilitate educational best practices.  Implications for inequality and higher education policy are discussed.

About the Speaker

Carrie Shandra is a Sociologist at the State University of New York at Stony Brook who studies work and life course inequalities in the United States.  Her current research centers on three areas: (1) internships and the college to career transition; (2) adolescent disability and employment trajectories, and (3) disability, time use, and nonmarket work.  She is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.  Prior to Stony Brook, Shandra was an Assistant Professor at Hofstra University and a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellow.  She received her Ph.D. from Brown University.

Carrie Shandra picture