Joseph McCartney Waggle

Doctoral Candidate

Joe McCartney Waggle is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park, and a fellow in the Program for Society and the Environment (PSE). His primary interests are in the sociology of knowledge, environmental sociology, and science and technology studies (STS).

Joe's recent research on the Climate Constituencies Project funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation engages social network analysis (SNA) techniques to interrogate the role of scientific consensus in policy making and the shifting role of scientific expertise in political debate. His doctoral dissertation Scientists Say: A Case Study of Scientific Expertise in a Post-Modern Political Discourse (manuscript in preparation) examines the motivations behind political engagement with scientific research and expertise in United States politics. In this qualitative project, Joe combines content analysis and interviews with climate change policy actors at the federal level and across a selection of states to gauge a diverse range of actors’ perceptions about science.

Joe is a member of the Publications Committee of the Science, Knowledge, and Technology (SKAT) Section of the American Sociological Association (ASA), and he writes for the ASA SKAT Section Blog. He contributes to Cyborgology and he writes for the PSE Blog on issues related to science, technology, and the environment.

Joe earned his Bachelor of Arts with highest honors in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his Master of Arts in the social sciences with a concentration in sociology from the Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) at the University of Chicago where he received the Earl S. and Esther Johnson Prize.

Publications/References

Fisher, D. R., Galli Robertson, A. M., McCartney Waggle, J., Dewey, A. M., Dubin, A. H., & Yagatich, W. (in press). Polarizing climate politics in America. In B. Wejnert (Series Ed.), Research in Political Sociology: Vol. 25. Environment, politics and society (R. Alagan & S. Aladuwaka, Eds.). Bingley, UK: Emerald Publishing Limited.

Fisher, D. R., Svendsen, E. S., Waggle, J., Galli, A. M., & Low, S. C. (2015). Under the green umbrella: A census of civic environmental stewardship organizations in the city of Philadelphia. Retrieved from U.S. Forest Service website: https://www.fs.fed.us/nrs/philadelphia/local-resources/docs/philly_stew-map_whitepaper_final.pdf

Fisher, D. R., Waggle, J., & Jasny, L. (2015). Not a snowball’s chance for science. Contexts, 14(4), 44-49. doi:10.1177/1536504215611896

Fisher, D. R., Waggle, J., & Leifeld, P. (2012). Where does political polarization come from? Locating polarization within the U.S. climate change debate. American Behavioral Scientist, 57(1), 70-92. doi:10.1177/0002764212463360

Jasny, L., Dewey, A. M., Galli Robertson, A., McCartney Waggle, J., Yagatich, W., Dubin, A. H., & Fisher, D. R. (2017). Shifting echo chambers in US climate policy networks. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Jasny, L., Waggle, J., & Fisher, D. R. (2015). An empirical examination of echo chambers in US climate policy networks. Nature Climate Change, 5(8), 782-786. doi:10.1038/nclimate2666

McCartney Waggle, J. (2017). Scientists say: A case study of scientific expertise in a post-modern political discourse (Doctoral dissertation). Manuscript in preparation.

McCartney Waggle, J. (2017, March 15). Administrating science in an anti-science administration [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.cse.umd.edu/blog/administrating-science-in-an-anti-science-administration

Waggle, J. (2007). Anonymous love: A look at the effect of social support networks on the bug chaser community in Chicago, IL (Unpublished master’s thesis). University of Chicago.

Waggle, J. (2014). [Review of the book Exposed science: Genes, the environment, and the politics of population health, by Sara Shostak]. Global Public Health, 9(9), 1119-1121. doi:10.1080/17441692.2014.955043

Waggle, J. (2014, September 23). The politics of scared scientists [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.cse.umd.edu/blog/the-politics-of-scared-scientists

Waggle, J. (2015, February). Science as political strategy: A comparative case study of perceptions of science in American politics. In D. R. Fisher (Chair), Workshop for Society and the Environment. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Program for Society and the Environment at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Waggle, J. (2015, February 2). Science as political strategy [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.cse.umd.edu/blog/science-as-political-strategy

Waggle, J. (2015, March 9). Augmented mobilization at the People’s Climate March [Web log message]. Retrieved from https://thesocietypages.org/cyborgology/2015/03/09/augmented-mobilization-at-the-peoples-climate-march/

Waggle, J. (2015, August). What science means: New directions for studying the science-policy interface. Paper session presented at the meeting of the Science, Knowledge, and Technology Section of the American Sociological Association, Chicago.

Waggle, J. (2015, August 17). PSE at #asa15: “What science means: New directions for studying the science-policy interface.” [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.cse.umd.edu/blog/-what-science-means-new-directions-for-studying-the-science-policy-interface

Waggle, J. (2015, August 19). Dignity, bureaucracy, and bioethics [Web log message]. Retrieved from https://thesocietypages.org/cyborgology/2015/08/19/dignity-bureaucracy-and-bioethics/

Waggle, J. (2016, March 4). Technology that "works for us and not against us": Pathologizing technology shifts blame away from unequal social arrangements and onto the technologies that we use to maintain them [Web log message]. Retrieved from https://asaskat.com/2016/03/04/working-for-all-of-us-we-need-democratic-control-over-technology/

Waggle, J. (2016, November 4). Presidential outlook on science and technology issues [Web log message]. Retrieved from https://asaskat.com/2016/11/04/presidential-outlook-on-science-and-technology-issues/

Waggle, J. (2017, April 4). Drain the lab [Web log message]. Retrieved from https://thesocietypages.org/cyborgology/2017/04/04/drain-the-lab/

Waggle, J. & Fisher, D. R. (2013, August). Unpacking the meaning of scientific consensus: The case of climate change science and politics. Paper session presented at the 108th annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, New York.

Waggle, J., Humphreys, A., Liao, H.-T., & Degli Esposti, P. (2011, April). The new economies of the Web. In N. Jurgenson & P. J. Rey (Co-Chairs), Theorizing the Web. Symposium conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Areas of Interest:
  • Social Theory
  • Science, Knowledge, and Technology
  • Environment
  • Science Policy
Degrees
  • MA Social Sciences - University of Chicago - Chicago, IL
  • BA Sociology - University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley, CA
  • Joseph Joe Waggle UMD Sociology PSE Doctoral Candidate
3114 Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Building
Department of Sociology
Email: jwaggle@umd.edu