As a doctoral candidate, I enjoy thinking about the connections and relationships between race and space, particularly rural spaces and how the intersection of race and space contribute to many broad themes in sociology.  As a social movement scholar I am also interested in understanding contemporary Black resistance movements and have focused extensively on Black Lives Matter since 2016.  After 2020, I began to focus on the Environmental Justice Movement in rural space, specifically eastern, North Carolina.  As a researcher, I focused on mapping the components of a rural-based movement.  Relying on Aldon Morris's conceptualization of "local movement centers"  in the Origins of the Civil Rights Movement, as my theoretical framework, I sought to determine if the components critical to the success of a local movement center were still at play currently in rural, predominantly Black communities.  As a volunteer community organizer, I served primarily to disseminate information to communities to empower them to advocate on their behalf as they challenged industrial and agricultural polluters.  

 

Currently, my 3-paper dissertation examines the dynamics of power and how these dynamics play out through activists and activism in urban but primarily rural settings.  

In my free time, I enjoy learning new things, creative writing, reading, travelling nationally and abroad, and spending time with my family and friends.  

Areas of Interest

  • Race, Environmental Justice, Social Movements, Political Sociology

Degrees

  • MA
    Sociology
  • MA
    English
  • BA
    English

Research

  • Contributing Author. (Forthcoming 2024). “Rose Brewer.” In Fifty Key Scholars in Black Social Thought, edited by M.C. Jipguep-Akhtar and N. Khan. New York: Routledge.
  • Co-Author of article, “Renewable Ruses: Bioenergy Development in North Carolina’s Coastal Plains, September 2021
  • Author, 2020. “Space Invaders: Thick and other Essays by Tressie McMillan Cottom. Women’s Review of Books. 37 (5). 28-29
  • Co-Author of article, “On Transfer Student Success: Exploring the Academic Trajectories of Black Transfer Engineering Students from Community Colleges”, June, 2019
  • Editing and Writing Contributor to Contexts, an American Sociological Association publication, 2016-2018
  • Presented paper entitled, “The American Nuclear Reactor that Disappeared but is Still in Plain Site” at the Society for Applied Anthropology Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 2014
  • Presented paper presentation “The College Syllabus: Exploring a Systematic Impasse” at the Southern Sociological Society, New Orleans, March 2015
  • Presented paper entitled, “Give Me That Old Time Religion, Called Protests” at the 2015 American Sociological Association in Chicago, IL, August , 2015
Member of SisterMentors, a mentoring organization for girls and women of color.
Volunteer community organizer Sampson County, NC
Danielle Koonce
Email
dkoonce5 [at] umd.edu